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Hospital's new 64-slice CT scanner yields faster exams, less radiation

[October 04 2011] - The Hospital of Central Connecticut’s (HOCC) Emergency Department (ED) at its New Britain General campus has acquired a new 64-slice CT scanner specifically designed to offer a quick exam that yields superior image quality and significantly less radiation.

“This new scanner is faster and also reduces radiation exposure to the patient by 30 to 50 percent to the patient, depending on the study,” says Jeffrey Finkelstein, M.D., FACEP, chief of emergency medicine and CMIO.

While the radiation dose is comparably lower in the new GE Healthcare scanner, its images are “the equivalent high quality image that we’ve always produced,” says Joe Vaccarelli, HOCC’s administrative director for laboratory and radiology services. The 64-sclice scanner employs GE’s latest advancement in dose reduction.

Joel Gelber, M.D., associate chief of Radiology, notes the patient value of limiting radiation exposure from radiology tests, including CT scans, over a lifetime. “It’s especially important to try and minimize radiation in children and young adults,” Gelber says.

“As a medical facility,” he adds, “we are increasingly aware of the dangers of radiation over one’s lifetime and our goal is to try to minimize that while giving patients the optimal care that they need.”

The 64-slice CT scanner produces computerized X-ray images which can be manipulated into different three-dimensional views of body structures, including bone and soft tissue, in just seconds. Common CT exams in the ED are for abdominal, pelvic, chest, head and cervical spine areas.

At its New Britain General campus, the hospital also has a 64-slice PET-CT. The hospital’s Bradley Memorial campus has a 16-slice CT scanner. The offices of Mandell & Blau, 40 Hart St., New Britain will acquire the 32-slice CT scanner previously at the New Britain General campus ED.





The new 64-slice CT scanner is designed to offer a quick exam with superior image quality and significantly less radiation.