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Hospital using PET-CT to check for coronary artery disease

[February 21 2011] - The Hospital of Central Connecticut (HCC) is one of just a few hospitals in the state now using PET-CT imaging to test for coronary artery disease (CAD).
The PET-CT myocardial perfusion study checks for arterial blockage, marked by plaque buildup in arteries leading to the heart. Too much plaque may trigger a heart attack. Presence of coronary artery disease may necessitate need for an angioplasty to improve blood flow to the heart and possible stent placement to prevent artery renarrowing.
Justin Lundbye, M.D., director of Cardiology, notes the hospital is one of several in the state now offering this study. “It’s a superior test that more accurately diagnoses coronary artery disease in selected patients,” he says.
The PET-CT myocardial perfusion study, offered at the New Britain General campus, is available for select patients for whom a traditional stress test would limit test result accuracy due to excess tissue. Study criteria, based in part on American College of Cardiology guidelines, are males more than 250 pounds, and females more than 225 pounds.
The PET-CT study is quicker than the stress test, uses less radiation, and is complete with results available within an hour.
For more information about cardiology services at The Hospital of Central Connecticut, please visit http://www.thocc.org/services/cardiovascular/.